Coronavirus Opens Doors to Scams

Coronavirus Opens Doors to Scams

Below are some links to valuable resources to keep you safe and informed:


U.S. Small Business Administration Beware of Scams

U.S. Small Business Administration Scams and Fraud Alerts

Justice Department Beware of SBA Loan Scams

United States Secret Service - Massive Fraud Against State Unemployment Insurance Programs

FBI sees rise in COVID-19 fraud schemes.

Coronavirus stimulus check scams are out to swindle you out of $1,200: What you need to know

Florida man cautions about fake coronavirus stimulus check scam


Tips to Manage the Threat of COVID-19 Related Phishing Attacks


Protect yourself financially from the impact of the coronavirus


The CFPB continues to help consumers make informed financial decisions with up-to-date information and resources


Protecting your credit during the coronavirus pandemic


Coronavirus and dealing with debt: Tips to help ease the impact
Tips for financial caregivers during the coronavirus pandemic


The Coronavirus (COVID-19) has been a windfall for fraudsters as they exploit the global thirst for knowledge on the virus. Fraudsters have launched Coronavirus themed phishing attacks to deliver malware – typically credential-stealing banking Trojans. The phishing emails purport to be from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Fraudsters have also created fake websites to exploit Johns Hopkins University’s interactive Coronavirus dashboard to spread malware. 

Details

Fraudsters are exploiting the global thirst for knowledge about the virus by launching Coronavirus-themed phishing attacks to spread credential stealing malware. The emails, which contain an infected attachment or a link to a malicious website, are made to appear like they come from the CDC or the WHO. The WHO posted an article on its website warning users of this scam.

Fraudsters have also exploited Johns Hopkins University’s interactive Coronavirus dashboard containing an interactive map that tracks Coronavirus statistics by region. Cybersecurity firms have identified several fake Coronavirus interactive maps that infect user devices with credential-stealing malware. Fraudsters are circulating links to these malicious websites containing Coronavirus maps through social media and phishing emails.

Security blogger Brian Krebs reported several Russian cybercrime forums started selling infection kits that exploits John Hopkins University’s interactive Coronavirus dashboard as part of a Java-based malware deployment scheme.

There have also been reports of other Coronavirus-themed phishing campaigns aiming to spread malware, including:
• Coronavirus advice-themed phishing emails purporting to provide advice on how to protect against the virus. The emails might claim to be from medical experts near Wuhan, China where the Coronavirus started.
• Workplace policy-themed phishing emails about Coronavirus targeting an organization’s employees. For example, the emails may purport to come from the organization’s HR department alerting employees of a new pandemic policy.